Why you should read India's Struggle for Independence by Bipin Chandra for UPSC exams?

Written by Girishkumar Kumaran, PhD. Last updated at 2022-08-13 09:21:15

If you want to understand India's early struggle for independence, there's no better book than Bipin Chandra's India's Struggle for Independence. In this book, Chandra discusses mainly the role of Congress and its leaders in the freedom movement. He also details how other political organizations like the Muslim League and the Hindu Mahasabha contributed to India gaining freedom from Britain.

It has a neutral approach without any bias.

One of the most critical aspects of history is its neutrality. Many books on India's struggle for independence have a strong bias toward the British or the freedom fighters. But this book by Bipin Chandra has a neutral approach without any discrimination. This makes it one of the most important books to read when preparing for competitive exams like UPSC and Bank PO because you need to know both sides equally well if you want to pass these exams with flying colors!

However, you should also note that there are certain areas where this book does not cover everything in detail; some concepts are not explained very well, and that's why we strongly recommend reading other sources along with this book too!

It gives you an up-to-date account of the freedom struggle.

This book provides a detailed account of India's socio-political events, from the 1857 revolt to the Quit India Movement. It is an up-to-date account of India's freedom struggle, emphasizing Bengal and Punjab. You will find all the important events covered in this book, making it an excellent source for you to write your essay on India's struggle for independence. In addition, you can use this as a perfect guide for your essay if you are writing about any other topic related to Indian histories, such as the Partition of Bengal or Dalit movement, etcetera.

The book is highly informative and helpful for Civil Service Examinations.

I read the book India’s Struggle for Independence by Bipin Chandra because I wanted to study more about Indian History. The book is highly informative and helpful for Civil Service Examinations. It is also a good source of material on India’s struggle for independence, which is why it should be read by students preparing for UPSC exams or anyone who wants to learn about this period in our history. Understanding the Partition of India and Pakistan will help you understand the reasons behind many conflicts that are still happening today at the border areas between these two countries (like Kashmir).

It gives you a clear idea about the socio-political events in India.

The book provides a clear idea about the socio-political events in India. It describes the historical and socio-political events in India during the British Raj. The book explains how India's freedom struggle began, who was involved in it, and how they struggled for freedom. It also describes how Mahatma Gandhi played an essential role in the Indian independence movement by leading a non-violent protest against British rule through his famous slogan “Give me liberty or give me death.”

It offers an overview of the partition of India and Pakistan.

This book provides an overview of the partition of India and Pakistan. The author Bipin Chandra has written this book with a neutral approach without any bias. This makes it one of the most recommended books for students preparing for UPSC exams or Civil Service Examinations. It offers an overview of the partition of India and Pakistan, which includes all relevant socio-political events in India from 1857 till 1947 when India became independent from Britain.

It helps understand the complexities between Hindus and Muslims during British Raj.

This book is written in a neutral tone, which makes it easy to understand. It is highly informative, covering almost every aspect of the struggle for independence. It will help you understand the complexities between Hindus and Muslims during British Raj. This book is handy for UPSC exams. Still, it can also be used by candidates preparing for civil service exams like SSC CGL/PO/Clerk and other competitive examinations such as IBPS Clerk, Railway Clerk, etc.

The book is highly recommended for students who are preparing for UPSC exams.

The book is highly recommended for students who are preparing for UPSC exams. Students preparing for UPSC exams should read this book because it provides the history of India's struggle for independence in a very concise form. The author has also included some important events surrounding Gandhi's life and his role in bringing about the freedom of India from British rule, which makes it worthwhile to know all these things before taking an exam on this topic.

This book is one of the most popular and comprehensive books on the Indian Independence movement. As the title suggests, it discusses in detail all aspects of the struggle for independence and gives a complete picture of this struggle.

The book begins with a brief history of British rule in India and then continues to discuss various phases that led to India's freedom from Britain. These phases include political changes outside India (for instance, World War II) and internal changes within India (for example, the Quit India Movement).

The book discusses the challenges, movements, and critical players on India's path to freedom in great detail.

The book is a comprehensive one. The author has discussed the challenges, movements, and critical players on India's path to freedom in great detail.

This book will teach you about significant events that led to India's struggle for independence from British rule and how Gandhi used unique methods such as non-violence and hunger strikes to gain attention from colonial powers like Britain, America, and France.

The author, through his narrative, brings out the fundamental issues involved in the Indian independence struggle.

He covers many aspects of the Indian independence movement, such as its leadership, unity, the role of intellectuals, economic factors, and social reformers. The book provides a comprehensive account of how we made history for ourselves through our efforts. This is an insightful read if you want to know more about India's struggle for freedom.

In this post, we will look at some of the significant insights from the book.

One of these critical aspects was how there were divisions within Congress over its approach to Swaraj (self-rule). Some wanted complete independence, and others felt that the British should be given a chance at first by working with them for reforms such as expanding democracy, ending caste discrimination, etc. Still, if that did not work, they should fight for complete freedom from foreign rule.

The Indian National Congress, formed in 1885, was first a party of middle-class Indians who were more concerned with constitutional reforms rather than demanding complete Independence.

In the decades following its formation, the Indian National Congress was a party of middle-class Indians who were more concerned with constitutional reforms rather than demanding complete independence. It was led by Dadabhai Naoroji and Surendranath Banerjea, two prominent leaders of the 19th century. Congress mandated an equal place for Indians in government service and opposed British rule in India because it violated long-established rights.

In addition to its work for constitutional reform, Congress also agitated against some of Britain's laws in India: for example, those governing property rights for women or against racial discrimination based on caste or religion.

It was only during the arrival of Gandhi that the party started to fight for complete Independence instead of just reforms.

Gandhi’s arrival in India in 1915 is a seminal event in the history of India’s struggle for Independence. Before his arrival, the National Congress, controlled by moderate leaders like Gopal Krishna Gokhale and Dadabhai Naoroji, was fighting for reforms within the British Empire. However, once Gandhi arrived in India, he called for complete independence from British rule instead of just fighting for reforms within the empire. He launched a series of movements, including the Non-Cooperation Movement (1920), the Civil Disobedience Movement (1930), and the Quit India Movement (1942). Gandhi was imprisoned several times during these movements, but that did not deter him from continuing his fight against British rule until India gained independence on 15th August 1947.

Gandhi was able to mobilize peasants and people from all walks of life.

While Gandhi was able to mobilize peasants and people from all walks of life with his efforts and various programs like the Non-Cooperation Movement and Quit India Movement, he struggled to give any realistic plan for freeing India from British rule. He did not realize that the imperialist power of Britain was too strong to be defeated by non-violent civil disobedience alone.

Gandhi could not have realized this because, despite his extraordinary powers of persuasion, he never fully understood the nature of imperialism or capitalism as an economic system. He believed capitalists were essentially good people who would leave when confronted with the right kind of moral pressure he applied through his methods of non-violence.

In 1942 Quit India movement failed to gain ground because most political parties did not support it as it lacked a clear plan for Independence apart from Gandhi's call to "do or die."

In 1942, the Quit India movement failed to gain ground because most political parties did not support it as it lacked a clear plan for Independence apart from Gandhi's call to "do or die." The movement was also not well organized.

Gandhi said he would join the struggle when Britain was at war with Germany, but this did not happen until after Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941. When asked about his absence from India during such crucial times by an American journalist, Gandhi said that he would only return if invited by the people of India and their leaders. This was true because of how much respect he commanded among them; however, no one came forward to invite him back home during this period, which explains why many believe that his presence in India could have made a difference in its independence struggle.

The prominent figure who brought about change was Subhash Chandra Bose.

The prominent figure who brought about change was Subhash Chandra Bose, elected president of Congress twice (1938 & 1939) but couldn't hold office due to differences with Gandhi. Bose wanted immediate Independence, whereas Gandhi wanted a non-violent struggle for freedom.

Bose also formed Indian National Army (INA) with Japanese help in 1942. The INA fought British forces in Burma and other parts of South Asia until 1945, when it disbanded itself at the end of World War II. However, despite its best efforts, the INA failed in its attempt to push British forces out of India.

The British wanted to maintain the status quo.

The British wanted to maintain the status quo. They tried to keep India as a colony, under their control, and as a third-rate power. They also wished to keep India backward, so they could continue to exploit its resources and workforce.

The British were very successful in their efforts at colonization of India because they had superior military might with which they could subdue any resistance from the Indian people.

The British wanted India to remain a third-rate power

The British weren't just afraid of India's political and military power. They were also fearful of its economic, cultural, and social control.

The Indian economy was so strong that it could challenge the British economy. Indian exports to Britain were far greater than the value of imports from Britain into India. This meant that India was a net creditor country for Britain!

Indians were also culturally influential; they had built one of the world's most prominent civilizations with their art forms like classical music and dance. These cultural influences still exist today, reminding us how influential our culture shapes our identity as Indians worldwide.

There were diverse political views among Indians, and different leaders represented different sections of Indians.

Understanding the diverse political views among Indians and different leaders representing different sections of Indians is essential. At this time, there were many other groups of Indians. Some wanted to keep the British in India, and some wanted to get rid of them. Some wanted to create a new country, which would have its government and laws made by Indians for the Indian people. Others wanted a change in their relationship with Britain, but nothing too radical would damage peace or stability between countries.

You must understand these four primary groups when learning about Independence because they will help you understand why we ended up getting independence from Britain the way we did!

Glimpses of democracy were seen in the 1920s and 1930s.

There were also signs of democracy in other spheres of life. As more political parties came into being, new newspapers appeared, and campaigns began to be organized around the country. Political meetings were held, and slogans were shouted. People who had been active in the freedom struggle for extended periods became leaders who could rally many people around them. Still, there was no question of their having any real power to enforce their wishes on government or society.

The Muslims wanted independence from Britain to create Pakistan before India became independent.

You may be surprised to learn that many Muslims in India did not want independence from Britain. Many wanted to create Pakistan first and then have India become independent later.

Why would they do this? Well, it’s because, for some Muslims, Pakistan was about being able to form their homeland—a place where they could live as a minority community in relative safety. The problem was that the majority population in India was Hindu, making it difficult for the Muslim population to feel like they had equal rights or freedoms under British rule.

The relationship between Gandhi and Nehru was taut

Nehru and Gandhi had very different views on how India should be ruled. Nehru was a socialist and wanted to see the country controlled by its people instead of the British government. Gandhi was a conservative who believed everyone should have equal rights, but he disagreed with Nehru's ideas about how the country should be run in the future.

Nehru was also impatient, while Gandhi believed in patience and peaceful protest. This led to many arguments as they tried to work together for their cause. Nehru was a lawyer from a wealthy family. At the same time, Gandhi was born into poverty and raised as an orphan before becoming an influential religious leader later on in his life. They were both brilliant men with excellent skills that helped them participate in India's Independence movement; however, some differences in their personalities caused tension between them during those years leading up until independence finally arrived.

Mahatma Gandhi had a significant influence on India's independence struggle.

When you think of India's independence struggle, Mahatma Gandhi is the first name that comes to mind. Born on October 2nd, 1869, in Porbander, Gujarat, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian nationalist leader who played a significant role in India’s freedom struggle against British rule. He was also known as the Father of India and Father of the Nation.

Gandhi organized the Non-Cooperation Movement in 1920 and proposed a complete boycott of foreign products starting with cloths made from foreign cloth materials like cotton, silk, etc.* He even went on to organize a mass protest march from Sabarmati Ashram to Dandi (more than 100 km away) where he picked up salt illegally under his leadership and started selling it as a protest against taxes imposed by British rulers on salt producers.*

Gandhi was jailed for his role in this movement along with other leaders such as Jawaharlal Nehru. He was soon released after being permitted by General John Simon on illness (tuberculosis). He resumed fighting for independence along with other leaders until 1930 when he started another movement called Salt Satyagraha which involved breaking laws related to the production/sale/possession of salt without paying tax.

In 1947, Mountbatten decided over India's future against the wishes of both Gandhi and Nehru.

The last Viceroy of India, Lord Louis Mountbatten, decided over India’s future against the wishes of both Gandhi and Nehru.

In 1947, Mountbatten was the one who made the final decision regarding whether or not India would become a single country or remain divided into two independent countries: India and Pakistan. He also called for an immediate end to British rule in India. This incensed Congress leaders like Jawaharlal Nehru because they believed Indians needed more time to prepare for independence than just three months after World War II ended (especially since there were still millions of refugees from a partition ).

But it didn't stop there—Mountbatten was also responsible for creating Pakistan as an independent nation!

After independence, the British lost their influence in India.

The British left India in 1947, and their relationship with the country was never the same. They no longer controlled its affairs or controlled Indian affairs.

The British had been responsible for governing India for almost three hundred years—but now they were out of power and would not return until a decade later when they sent troops to fight wars against Pakistan (1952) and China (1962).

The book is highly recommended for students who are preparing for UPSC exams.

The book is highly recommended for students who are preparing for UPSC exams. Students preparing for UPSC exams should read this book because it provides the history of India's struggle for independence in a very concise form. The author has also included some important events surrounding Gandhi's life and his role in bringing about the freedom of India from British rule, which makes it worthwhile to know all these things before taking an exam on this topic.

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