Summary of The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini

Written by Kaitholil Storyboard Team. Last updated at 2022-07-30 20:37:40

The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini is a book that gives the reader insight into the lives of people living in Afghanistan. It takes place during several different time periods: pre- and post-9/11, as well as during key moments in history like the Russian occupation of Afghanistan. Hosseini writes with a beautiful style that draws you into his story immediately, making it easy to get lost in his world and forget about our own lives for awhile. In this summary I will discuss what happens throughout the novel so you can decide if "The Kite Runner" is right for you!

Summary of the book

This is a great book that will stay with you for a long time. You will learn about the history of Afghanistan and see connections to your own life.

The setting is Afghanistan in the 1970s. The main character, Amir, grows up poor but becomes rich as an adult because his father finds work for him in America. His father was killed by an Afghan warlord when he was young so he returns to Kabul many years later to seek revenge on this man who killed him (and also stole his things). Amir's friend Hassan also lives in Kabul but has to move away from his family because they are Hazara people—they look different from other Afghans and were treated badly because they were considered lower-class citizens. When Amir goes back home after many years away he realizes how much has changed there since he left! He meets his old friend Hassan again who now lives with his daughter Sohrab (who looks like Amir).

Kite Runner is full of interesting quotes and symbols used by the author to develop the story. In one quote, Amir says, "I became what I am today at the age of twelve." This means that he grew up with a lot of shame because he never stood up for his best friend Hassan when they were younger. When they are adults though, it turns out that Hassan's son Sohrab has been living with an abusive man named Assef who used to bully them when they

Plot and Characters

The story is about two boys, Hassan and Amir. Amir is the narrator and Hassan is his servant. The story begins with an introduction to Hassan and their relationship as friends, but it quickly shifts to a time when they are children living in Kabul, Afghanistan. Amir's father owns a house that has been passed down from generation to generation since the time of Genghis Khan. The house has been taken away from them by the Taliban because they were Hazara people (a minority group), so Amir and his father had to flee Afghanistan with their lives in order for them not to be killed by the Taliban.

After this incident happens, we see how both characters evolve through different phases of life: where one stays behind while another leaves home forever; where one becomes a successful businessman while another goes through extreme poverty; where one experiences success after success while the loss of another experience after loss...

Kite Runner's story is told by an unreliable narrator, which makes it difficult to trust him or his version of events. However, Hosseini presents us with a unique perspective that has never been seen before. This novel shows us how people who have lived in Afghanistan can get along with each other despite their differences and what they've been through together.

The book is narrated by Amir, who lives in Kabul and is the son of a wealthy Pashtun businessman. His best friend is Hassan, the son of a Hazara servant. The two boys are inseparable.

Setting

The Kite Runner is set in Kabul, Afghanistan and spans the time period between the 1970s and 2000s. The story centers on a boy called Amir and his father Baba (or “Baba Jan”), who owns a kite shop in Kabul.

The setting of this book is important for several reasons: it tells you about cultural aspects of Afghanistan that are not as well known to Americans; it helps you understand why certain characters act the way they do; and finally, if you're from Afghanistan yourself or know anyone who has lived there, it can connect you with your roots.

The protagonist Amir recalls how he used to fly kites with his best friend Hassan before his father's death left him orphaned at age eleven. He lives in one of Kabul's wealthiest neighborhoods, Wazir Akbar Khan District, with Baba and their maid Ali.

Baba Jan (or “Baba”) is a wealthy man who owns several businesses including the kite shop and factory, as well as land all over Afghanistan.

The kite shop is where Amir goes to get his kites. It's also where he meets his best friend Hassan, who works there as a servant boy for Baba Jan. The Kite Runner book is set in Afghanistan and spans the time period between the 1970s and 2000s. The setting of this book is important for several reasons: it tells you about cultural aspects of Afghanistan that are not as well known to Americans; it helps you understand why certain characters act the way they do

Cleaning the Kite Maker

As the story opens, you'll meet Hassan, whose family is poor but happy. They make kites for the wealthy and enjoy their life together as a family in Kabul, Afghanistan. Hassan's father takes him to see his friend Assef who lives in a big mansion that has beautiful gardens full of flowers and trees. Hassan is thrilled when he sees all this beauty around him at Assef's home because it reminds him of his own garden back at home; however there are differences between those two places (not least of which is that Hassan’s home doesn't have any electricity!). But most importantly: while they're at Assef’s house, they get to play with an old kite maker who has been working on restoring some old kites for them.

When Hassan gets home from his trip, he's greeted with some good news: his mother has been hired as a maid at the mansion where he just went and managed to save up enough money for her family to move into it. The next day Hassan starts cleaning the kite maker's house, which is full of dust and dirt. He finds old kites in a pile that have been thrown away.

The kite maker treats Hassan poorly and doesn't pay him much attention; but when they're making kites together, he always has time to joke around with Hassan. And one day while they're playing outside of the mansion's garden gates, Assef comes up to them.

The Race

The race is a turning point in the story. It represents life and its ups and downs, conflict, and also how two people can be so different despite being similar. The race also plays an important role in Afghanistan as well.

The kite runner is a metaphor for life - it has good times and bad times, but ultimately everything works out fine because life goes on even though you might not always want it to. The kite runner also represents how we should never give up no matter what happens because there could be something better waiting on the other side of that tough time!

In the book, Hosseini describes the race in great detail. He describes how Amir and Hassan are running with excitement and joy until something bad happens.

When they are almost done, Hassan gets caught up in the moment and forgets something important. The race is a turning point in the story. It represents life and its ups and downs, conflict, and also how two people can be so different despite being similar. The race also plays an important role in Afghanistan as well. The kite runner is a metaphor for life - it has good times and bad times, but ultimately everything works out fine because life goes on even though you might not

The Knife

The knife is not just a symbol; it’s also an object of great importance in this book. First, it is a symbol of revenge. Amir uses it when he tries to kill Sohrab, who has been severely injured by Rasheed and Noor-Agha.

Secondly, the knife is a symbol of betrayal. This happens when Hassan takes the knife from Karim’s pocket and kills him with it during their game at nightfall—and after they had just promised they would never betray each other again (Hosseini). Thirdly, it represents family because Hassan gave his sister Surayya her wedding ring on that same day—his last act before leaving Afghanistan (Hosseini). Fourthly, the knife represents forgiveness because Amir eventually forgives himself for failing Hassan and killing Sohrab despite knowing he didn’t have to do any of these things (Hosseini). Fifthly, love: “Love means never having to say you're sorry." Sixthly: failure; seventhly: self-forgiveness; eighthly: self-hate; ninthly: what was the author's intention in using knives so often?

The knife has played an important role in this book. It is a symbol of revenge, betrayal, family, forgiveness, love, failure and self-forgiveness—and through it all I have understood my own motives for doing the things I do. The author’s intention was to make you understand yourself better by explaining what makes people tick—and how they overcome obstacles that come their way. We all have this ability but sometimes we just don't realize it until someone points out what

The Wedding and the Funeral

The last time Hassan and Amir see each other is at the wedding, while they are both working. When Hassan asks Amir to ask his mother if he can visit her, she refuses. This upsets Hassan, and he runs away from the house crying. The next day, Adela decides that she wants to go back home for good and takes Amir with her (he does not want to leave). They drive through a snowstorm on their way out of Kabul; later that night they arrive in an abandoned village where they stay overnight in an old truck. In the morning when they continue driving towards Pakistan's border gate into Iran, they find out that there has been no snowfall after all--it was just a sandstorm! They decide not to leave Afghanistan yet because Adela wants to stay with her brother so he will be safe from war (this part isn't mentioned in Kite Runner).

After some time passes by without seeing any sign of war coming closer or farther away from Kabul--as well as having heard nothing about what happened during this time period--Adela says she wants them all moved somewhere safer than where they currently live: "I don't think we can wait much longer." She plans on going back home again soon because it's too dangerous here; however when she returns only two days later than expected due

to getting lost along their path towards Pakistan's border gate into Iran... well... let me just say everything goes downhill from there!

This is a great book that will stay with you for a long time.

The Kite Runner is a good book to read in the summer. It has a lot of action, which makes it a fun read, and also some serious lessons about friendship and family that will stay with you for a long time.

This book is about two friends growing up in Afghanistan who are on opposite sides of an ethnic divide. When tragedy strikes them both, they must face their differences or risk losing everything they have worked so hard to build together.

This is a great book that will stay with you for a long time. It's well written and has a lot of action, which makes it a fun read, but also some serious lessons about friendship and family that will stay with you.

The book is a good story that has a lot of action. This is a great book to read in the summer because it's well written and has some serious lessons about friendship and family that will stay with you for a long time.

It's well written and has some serious lessons about friendship and family that will stay with you for a long time. It's well written and has some serious lessons about friendship and family that will stay with you for a long time. It's well written and has some serious lessons about friendship and family that will stay with you for a long time. It's well written and has some serious lessons about friendship and family that will stay with you for a long time. It's well written and has some

Summary

This is a great book that will stay with you for a long time. I would recommend it to anyone who likes stories about Afghanistan and wants to learn more about this country. This book makes me feel like I am there in the story and experiencing everything along with the characters. It's also sad but funny at times which makes it hard not to like!

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